Invited Speakers: Key Note

Martin Hepp is a professor of General Management and E-Business at the Universität der Bundeswehr München in Germany, where he heads the E-Business and Web Science Research Group, and an Adjunct Senior Researcher at STI Innsbruck. He holds a master¹s degree in business management and business information systems and a PhD in business information systems from the University of Wuerzburg (Germany). His key research interest is in using structured, linked data on a Web scale for e-business, in particular matchmaking and product data reuse, and the technical, social, and economic foundations of ontology engineering and usage. As part of his research, he developed the GoodRelations and eClassOWL ontologies, now widely used by companies like Google, Yahoo, BestBuy, Volkswagen, Sears, Renault, Kmart, and thousands of smaller retailers and manufacturers for describing offers on the Web. His work on Semantic Business Process Management and on the socio-economic constraints of creating Web-scale ontologies is widely cited, with more than 100 citations each. Also, he was the organizer of more than fifteen workshops and conference tracks on conceptual modeling, Semantic Web, and information systems topics and a member of more than sixty conference and workshop program committees, including ASWC, ESWC, IEEE CEC/EEE, and ECIS. In 2009, Martin has been awarded the honor of Senior Member by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Title:

From Ontologies to Web Ontologies: Lessons learned from Conceptual Modeling for the WWW

Abstract:

In computer science, ontologies are commonly understood as partly formal definitions of the conceptual elements in a domain of interest shared to by a community of adopters. Historically, the term "ontology" has been borrowed from the field of philosophy, and its meaning slightly changed, by computer science researchers. A popular justification for ontology-related research have been the challenges for information exchange, processing, and intelligent behavior on the World Wide Web, with its vast body of content, huge user base, linguistic and representational heterogeneity, and so forth. Suprisingly, there are just very few ontologies that are relevant at Web scale in the sense that they are used by a broad, open audience.

In this keynote talk, I will discuss whether there is a fundamental difference between traditional ontologies and Web ontologies, and analyze the the specific economic, social, and technical challenges of building, maintaining, and using socially agreed, global data structures that are suited for the WWW at large, also with respect to the skills, expectations, and particular needs of companies and Web developers.

Michael F. Uschold, PhD is an internationally recognized expert with over two decades experience in developing and transitioning semantic technology from academia to industry. He pioneered the field of ontology engineering, co-authoring the first paper, Ontologies: Principles, Methods and Applications, and co-presenting the first tutorial on the topic in 1995. He also authored the influential paper, “Enterprise Ontology.” Michael is Semantic Arts' ontology developer and semantic modeling expert.

Title:

Building Enterprise Ontologies: Report from the trenches…

Abstract:

We explore the issues and challenges that arise when building real world enterprise ontologies for large organizations. We address questions like:

  • What is the purpose of the ontology?
  • Where do you start?
  • What do you include?
  • Where does the knowledge come from?
  • Do you use an upper ontology? Which one?

We look at how to represent concepts beyond the usual people, places, and time and explore how these things impact the business. Many examples will be from the recently completed Sentara Healthcare Enterprise Ontology (SHEO) a comprehensive ontology in the business of healthcare.

Dr. Lee Harland is the Founder & Chief Technical Officer of Connected Discovery (http://connecteddiscovery.com/), a company established to promote and manage precompetitive collaboration within life science industry. Lee received his B.Sc. (Biochemistry) from the University Of Manchester, UK and Ph.D (Epigenetics & Gene Therapy) from the University Of London, UK. Lee has 15 years of experience leading informatics within major Pharma. His work spans data management, integration & warehousing, vocabulary & ontology, text-mining, competitor intelligence, knowledge and information management, data mining, bio- & chemo-informatics and software development. Lee is an active participant in the Pistoia-Alliance (http://www.pistoiaalliance.org/), Biosharing (http://biosharing.org/) and is a visitor at the University Of Oxford e-Research Center (http://www.oerc.ox.ac.uk/). Lee is currently the CTO for the Open PHACTS project (http://www.openphacts.org/), a major initiative to develop a robust software infrastructure for pharmaceutical research based on semantic technologies.

Title:

Practical Semantics In The Pharmaceutical Industry - The Open PHACTS Project

Abstract:

The information revolution has transformed many business sectors over the last decade and the pharmaceutical industry is no exception. Developments in scientific and information technologies have unleashed an avalanche content on research scientists who are struggling to access and filter this in an efficient manner. Furthermore, this domain has traditionally suffered from a lack of standards in how entities, processes and experimental results are described, leading to difficulties in determining whether results from two different sources can be reliably compared. The need to transform the way life-science industry uses information has led to new thinking about how companies should work beyond their firewalls. The formation of groups such as the Pistoia Alliance has provided a catalyst to initiatives around semantic enrichment of the scientific literature and vocabulary standards. In this talk I will outline the traditional approaches major pharmaceutical companies have taken to knowledge management and describe the business reasons why pre-competitive, cross-industry and public-private partnerships have gained much traction in recent years. I will then consider the scientific challenges concerning the integration of biomedical knowledge, highlighting the complexities in representing everyday scientific objects in computerised form. This leads to the third strand, technology, and how the semantic web might lead us at least someway to a long-overdue solution. The talk will be illustrated by case studies, focusing on the €20 million EU-Open PHACTS initiative (openphacts.org), established to provide a unique public-private infrastructure for pharmaceutical discovery. I will describe the aims of this work, and how technologies such as just-in-time identity resolution, nanopublication and interactive visualisations are helping to build a powerful software platform designed to appeal to directly to scientific users across the public and private sectors.